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How to Deal With the 5 Most Negative Types of Co-workers

How to Deal With the 5 Most Negative Types of Co-workers | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

I used to work with a colleague on the opposite coast, so her day started three hours before mine. And so, it was quite typical to check my voicemail first thing in the morning and hear an angry voice: “Lea, it’s Petra. Call me as soon as you get in.” Just listening her messages was exhausting, and the return phone calls were equally draining. Not a fun way to start the day.


In my entire career, she was the most difficult person I’ve ever worked with. You see, Petra was incredibly negative. Every conversation was full of drama: She’d ramble on about a bunch of issues she was having with a partner company, for example, then tell me I’d better get them straightened out. In the end, not only did I have to put out fires with the partner, but I also had to fight battles on my own team to get anything done. (It’s comical to note that I outranked Petra—and that she had created nearly all of the problems!)

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

No one likes working with an energy suck—so banish negativity in your office with these strategies.

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Guy Harris's curator insight, February 7, 4:58 AM

I believe that it helps to have a wide range of tactics and techniques at your disposal for the many kinds of "people problems" you are likely to encounter in your career. In this article, Lea offers some great tips that you can add to your communication and conflict resolution "tool kit".

CannizaroHouse's curator insight, February 7, 7:49 AM

We've all been there...good ideas and solutions.

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Researchers Have Found The Personality Type That's Most Linked To Success And Happiness

Researchers Have Found The Personality Type That's Most Linked To Success And Happiness | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it
Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

Are you a "glass half-full" or a "glass half-empty" kind of person?


As it turns out, some people can be both. So-called realistic optimists combine the positive outlook of optimists with the clear-eyed perspective of pessimists, new research has found.


These realistic optimists may get the best of both worlds, using their realism to perform better at work and elsewhere, but aren't getting bogged down by unhappiness, said Sophia Chou, an organizational psychology researcher at National Taiwan University, who presented her findings at a meeting of the American Psychological Association in Honolulu, Hawaii earlier this month.


Optimists and Pessimists


Past research has shown that optimists value thoughts that make them feel good about themselves, whereas pessimists prize a more truthful vision of themselves. But a clear-eyed view can be bad for pessimists' well-being, as they tend to be more prone to depression, Chou said. Optimists tend to live longer and be healthier overall.


After several years working in business, Chou noticed there were some people who were both optimistic and realistic, and that they tended to be very successful. She wondered whether realism and optimism were really diametrically opposed.


So Chou administered a battery of personality surveys to about 200 college and graduate students in Taiwan. The surveys tested how many "positive illusions" the students held, as well as whether they were more motivated by self-enhancement or reality.


Realistic Views


The optimists sorted into two camps: the realists and the idealists.

"Realistic optimists tend to choose accuracy over self-enhancement; the unrealistic optimists tend to choose self-enhancement," Chou said.


Interestingly, the realistic optimists also got better grades, on average, than their less grounded peers — probably because they didn't delude themselves into thinking they would do well without studying or working hard, Chou said.

Traditionally, a more realistic outlook is paired with poorer well-being and greater depression, yet the realistic optimists managed to be happy.


To understand why, she dug deeper into the personality assessments.


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John E Jenkins's curator insight, September 6, 2013 7:25 AM

It's good to know that a realistic recognition that challenges exist, does not mean you are a pessimist.

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Turning Negative Feedback Into An Opportunity

Turning Negative Feedback Into An Opportunity | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

Nobody likes negative feedback. No matter how much you claim to want an honest critique, it stings.


But this time of year when we're resolving to improve ourselves and perhaps undergoing performance reviews we're more likely than ever to encounter negative feedback. Instead of viewing it as an excuse to binge eat or resort to retail therapy, see it as an opportunity to change.


"No one likes negative feedback. It makes them think less of the person giving the feedback and leads to them rejecting the person and the feedback," says George Bradt, an executive coach and author of First-Time Leader, noting that feedback is critical to any improvement.

 


Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

Instead of viewing criticism at work as an excuse to binge eat or resort to retail therapy, see it as an opening to change.

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