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Managing Transitions: CFO Regrets

Managing Transitions: CFO Regrets | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

Based on historical averages, nearly one in five CFOs in the Fortune 1000 may change this year. In Deloitte's study - Taking the reins: Managing CFO transitions—they found CFOs had to manage three key resources to successfully navigate through their first year:


  • Time—Both their own and their staff’s
  • Talent—Having the right people to execute initiatives
  • Relationships—Both internal and external to the company
Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

Getting a slow start on their talent needs and skimping on cultural due diligence are their two biggest regrets about CFOs first year on the job, say many CFOs interviewed.

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(Infographic) The Top 10 Regrets In Life By Those About To Die

(Infographic) The Top 10 Regrets In Life By Those About To Die | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

Last year we shared with you The Top 5 Regrets Of The Dying. We were inspired by Bronnie Ware who originally created the article so we decided to interview a number of patients ourselves in palliative care units and nursing homes who are seeing their last days to share their regrets in life. Their answers were highly memorable so we have decided to create an Infographic of ‘The Top 10 Regrets In Life By Those About To Die’ for the world to share and learn from, before it’s too late


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Top Five Regrets of the Dying

Top Five Regrets of the Dying | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

For many years I worked in palliative care. My patients were those who had gone home to die. Some incredibly special times were shared. I was with them for the last three to twelve weeks of their lives.People grow a lot when they are faced with their own mortality. I learnt never to underestimate someone's capacity for growth. Some changes were phenomenal. Each experienced a variety of emotions, as expected, denial, fear, anger, remorse, more denial and eventually acceptance. Every single patient found their peace before they departed though, every one of them.


When questioned about any regrets they had or anything they would do differently, common themes surfaced again and again. Here are the most common five

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